Papillon d' Amour

04:00, B/W, Stereo
Nicolas Provost: Papillon d' Amour

Nicolas Provost: Papillon d' Amour

According to the world community of cinema buffs, Kurosawa's film Rashomon (1951) belongs to the top ten of absolute cinema classics. This film recounts the story of a woman being raped and a man being murdered from different perspectives. The magnificent black-and-white images express the maker's vision on the narrative possibilities of film and the role and position of the experiencing, observing viewer. Particularly due to these aspects and a powerful use of simplicity, Rashomon has remained a permanent source of inspiration for filmmakers and other artists. With Papillon d'Amour and Bataille, Nicolas Provost joins the devotees. He makes use of original material with the images mirrored in the longitudinal axis, which yields a sequence of new, associative images. The characters are transformed into new life forms with miraculous capabilities that defy the laws of gravitation. At the same time, Provost keeps the viewer (who is, or is not, familiar with the original film and 'the' story) on a string. The viewer's impulse to interpret the new representation as a story is encouraged by the subtle preservation of residues of Kurosawa's narrative. A powerful, evocative, supporting sound and music track ensures that all this comes across even better. Papillon d'Amour is centred on a female form that performs a ritual, being watched by a male counterpart. Spiralling and screaming, it undergoes a catharsis (or is it self-imposed chastisement?) which culminates in complete disappearance.
(Netherlands Media Art Institute, Vinken & van Kampen.)